About peachy

Peachy Keen specializes in Vintage for formal, festive and every day wear. If you are trying to create a ‘look’ we can help with suggestions on how to put together key pieces that won’t break the bank. As well as Vintage clothing for men and women we also make corsets for general wear, special occasions and to help with posture and weight loss.

 

If you have Vintage to sell please call Jill at 021 822 774.

 


The 1980′s was once more all about decadence. In fact it began to mirror the roaring 20′s and even the glamourous 50′s. The 80′s gave us great copies of those eras which are so useful for Vintage dressing. Money was everywhere and Gordon Gecko told us ‘Greed is good.”

At the end of the 70′s the Punk Movement had formed and carried us into the 80′s and the New Wave Movement and the New Romantics.

Silver, black and flouro colors all give us a sense of the era. Men dressed up as Dandys again like Adam and the Ants. Women cut and bleached their hair.

1980s


At the end of the 1960′s California gave us the “Summer of love”. Everyone was turning on and dropping out. Hair got longer, clothes got looser and fabrics got wilder.

It was all about colors, patterns, flowers, floaty fabrics, bellbottom pants and headbands. Woodstock defined a generation.

 

1970s


After the luxurious glamour of 1950′s America when everything bigger was better London broke away with a look so new it took the rest of the world time to catch up.

Mary Quant invented the mini skirt and Vidal Sasson cut the first blunt cut bob since the roaring 20′s. Suddenly our clothes were short and sharply tailored. Men’s suits pared down to the slimmest and trimmest ever. We saw the rise of the Beatles and longer hair on men and fights broke out between the Rockers of the 50′s and the new Mods of the 60′s.

Because the skirts got so short MQ invented panthose.

Pencil skirts to the knee with button down tailored shirts typified the Mod girl. Ben Sherman created the Mod man look still popular today. Slim cut, flat front pants with skinny ties.

Towards the end of the 60′s “Flower Power’ took hold on the world!

1960's


The war was over and Roosevelt was promising a chicken in every pot and a car in every garage. Welcome to the 50′s! It was a brave new world after the darkest of days.

Rock and roll was born in the States and for the first time the young ruled the world.

Pencil skirts, leather jackets and polka dots were everywhere and for a more demure look the giant tutu petticoat under a shirtwaist dress was a common site on the American housewife.

For the men, Hawaiian shirts for holidays and button down shirts and ties with wide leg pants, hats and loafers.

1950s


After the Great Depression there was worse to come. It was not long since the first world war of 1914-18 which was known as ‘The Great War’ and believed to be the war to end all wars.

Suddenly a new menace reared up and the world was plunged into darkness. No-one felt frivolous and the clothing reflected that. Men were in uniform once again and the women who stayed at home rolled up their sleeves. Many women wore suits or simple straight cut dresses. The shoulder pad gave women a sense of confidence to carry on while their men were away.

Stockings were hard to get. Socks and wedge sandals were a common look as was the scarf wrapped around the head and tied up at the front.

1940's


After the Roaring 20′s came the Great Depression of the 1930′s. Poverty was rampant in America as The Great Wall Street Crash caused the mills of industry to grind to a halt. The cinema became very important for escapism. Hollywood glamour took people out of themselves.

When we think of the depression era clothing we see more somber and simple lines. For the female working poor a simple cotton frock, the cheese cutter cap or flat cap and tweed for the men. Glamour gowns are also indicative of this era.

1930's


The 1920′s was a decade of excess and a new found freedom from the constraints of the Edwardian Age.

 

Women’s fashion had begun to turn away from restrictive tight garments and the upper classes reveled in dancing the night away in loose shift frocks and fringed flapper dresses. Everyone was dancing the Charleston and needed to be able to move around the floor separate from their partners.

 

Sequins, feathers and jeweled headpieces were common. Men moved away from black suits with stiff collars to a more casual look with ivory and cream linen suits.

 

1920s